Archives

Racing To Success

“This is John. He just ran the Boston Marathon.”That’s how Vanessa Bieker, mother of John Almeda and founder of Fly Brave, prefers to introduce her son. “Yes, John has nonverbal autism, but that’s not all that he is. John is first and foremost a...

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Future Humanitarian in the Making

Meet a teenager who works to better the lives of people with cerebral palsy.Allow us to introduce you to Hayes, a high school freshman. Hayes has been inspired to fundraise to support people with cerebral palsy since he was a child.His desire to...

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“I give my heart out to you as a card”

While you were searching for your perfect career, Kiki and Emily were busy turning their passion for art into a business – Bluem Prints. Bluem Prints defines itself as a company that offers “special cards collaboratively created and printed with...

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How to create a Facebook Fundraiser

You’re fantastic! Every good deed makes a difference, and each means even more when we give together. Thank you for looking at an opportunity to support UCP Sacramento! Facebook Fundraisers are a great way to raise critical funds for UCP Sacramento...

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Freedom of Expression

It’s been nearly five years since Greg, age 46 and diagnosed with intellectual disability, began attending a UCP Adult Day Program. At that time he was far from comfortable interacting with other people, but things have changed since then.Greg and...

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Five Ways Giving Is Good for You

Every day when I go to work, I’m surrounded by people passionate about their jobs. People whose primary goal is to produce hope and supply confidence in adults and children with disabilities. I work with people who are passionate about ensuring that others get opportunities to be all they can be and to see beyond their disabilities. Each day I view the generosity and kindness of the UCP team and see the impact their donation of time and caring can make in people’s lives.

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Make Your Mark with #GivingTuesday

Are you disappointed in the frenzy of consumerism on Black Friday and Cyber Monday? Now you can choose to inspire a culture of philanthropy with #GivingTuesday, a global day of giving to pay our good fortune forward!

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I Felt Helpless

At UCP’s 2018 Golf Classic, we asked Claudia Romero to share her story about the value of UCP Family Respite to her family. “The short answer is: UCP Family Respite means a lot to me. The long answer requires a little background,” says Claudia.

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One Person’s Vision is a University’s Historic Moment

Years ago, a mom of an Adapted Physical Education student and some Special Olympians asked Monica Lepore, a Special Olympics coach, if she knew about any Inclusive Higher Education programs. Many of her Special Olympians were graduating from high school and asked why their local college, West Chester University, did not have a program for them.

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Lauren’s World: My Life with Cerebral Palsy

After 3 years of fertility drugs, Mearl and Tina gave up on trying to get pregnant. They thought all hope was lost when suddenly, Tina was pregnant. It was a miracle! Nine months later, Tina went into labor at home and Mearl drove her to the hospital. Tina had a traumatic birthing experience. The baby’s heartbeat was lost a couple of times. The attending physician kept putting off a C-section. When the heartbeat flat-lined, the physician decided it was time for a crash C-section.

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Kevin Nagle Biography

Mr. Nagle was the co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Envision Pharmaceutical Holdings, the fifth largest prescription benefit managers nationally at the time, before it was acquired by the Rite Aid Corporation.

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History of UCP of Sacramento & Northern California

UCP was started in Sacramento in 1955 by parents who had a child born with a brain injury – cerebral palsy. At that time, the assumption was that they would put their child into state institutional care. These parents wanted a different life for their children. Those parents did not want their children in institutional care – forgotten by society. They wanted their children home and in community.

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